Month: January 2018

Information for Landlords in Community Associations

Renting in a Community Association 

If you are an owner who leases your unit, we’d like to make the leasing experience successful and positive for everyone by informing you of your responsibilities. This will help preserve your property value specifically and maintain the association’s property value in general.

 

Your tenants may not be familiar with common-interest community living. Please take a few minutes to explain to them that living in a community association is very different from living in a rental apartment community. Specifically, your tenants, like all residents, are subject to the rules and regulations of the association, and it’s up to you to educate them and see that they comply. The association will assist you in this area, but the responsibility lies with you. We recommend you provide your tenants with written copies of all policies and rules and advise them on the proper use of the association’s facilities. You can obtain copies of these and other useful documents from the manager.

 

We strongly recommend that you have a written lease agreement with your tenant. As a lessor (landlord) of a home in a community association, the lease you use must require tenants to comply with the association’s governing documents. In the event your tenant fails to comply with these documents, including the bylaws, or its rules and regulations, a representative of the association will first contact your tenants in an attempt to remedy the problem. The association will send you a copy of any notice sent to your tenant.

 

If the tenant does not correct the violation, the association will contact you and expect you to remedy the violation using the recourse available to you through your lease agreement. If you are unable to correct the violation, the association may pursue appropriate legal action against the tenant, and possibly against you.

 

Follow these simple steps and you, the tenants and the association will all have a positive community association living experience:

  • Provide your tenants with copies of association rules.
  • Educate tenants about the need to follow association rules, and see that they comply.
  • Advise tenants on the proper use of association facilities.
  • Use a written lease agreement.
  • Make sure your lease requires tenants to comply with all association governing documents.
  • Provide the association with contact information for your tenants.

 

Renters: If you don’t have a copy of the association rules or you’d like more information about the association, please contact a board member or the property manager.

 

If you have questions about your home or are having problems with a tenant complying with your Association’s governing documents, call us today and see what we can manage for you.

We’re Having What Kind of Meeting?

We’re Having What Kind of Meeting?

 

If you live in a HOA or Condo, or are on the Board in a HOA or Condo, you are probably getting notices left and right about meetings.

What’s the difference between a board meeting and a special meeting, or an annual meeting and a town meeting? Confused? Here’s some clarification.

 

Annual Meetings

 

Annual meetings—or annual membership meetings—are usually required by your governing documents, which specify when they’re to be conducted and how and when members are to be notified about the meeting. This is the main meeting of the year when members receive the new budget, elect a board, hear committee reports and discuss items of common interest. Click here for our HOA/Condo annual review meeting checklist or view below.

 

Special Meetings

 

Special meetings are limited to a particular topic. When the Board calls a special meeting (which they can do at any time), they must notify all members in advance. The notice will specify the topic so interested members can attend. Special meetings give the board an opportunity to explore sensitive or controversial matters—perhaps an assessment increase. Members do not participate in the meeting, unless asked directly by a board member, but they have a right to listen to the board discussion.

 

Town Meetings

 

Town meetings are informal gatherings intended to promote two-way communication; full member participation is essential to success. The board may want to present a controversial issue or explore an important question like amending the bylaws. The board may want to get a sense of members’ priorities, garner support for a large project or clarify a misunderstood decision.

 

Board Meetings

 

Most of the business of the association is conducted at regular board meetings. Board members set policy, oversee the manager’s work, review operations, resolve disputes, talk to residents and plan for the future. Often the health and harmony of an entire community is directly linked to how constructive these meetings are.

 

Executive Session

 

The governing documents require the association to notify you in advance of all meetings, and you’re welcome—in fact, encouraged—to attend and listen. The only time you can’t listen is when the board goes into executive session. Topics that the board can discuss in executive session are limited by law to a narrow range of sensitive topics. Executive sessions keep only the discussion private; no votes can be taken. The board must adjourn the executive session and resume the open session before voting on the issue. In this way, members may hear the outcome, but not the private details.

 

Parties

 

Occasionally the association notifies all residents of a meeting at which absolutely no business is to be conducted. Generally these meetings include food and music, and they tend to be the best attended meetings the association has. Oh, wait! That’s a party, not a meeting. Well, it depends on your definition of meeting.

 

 

Here is our annual review checklist which will come in handy for what type of meeting? An annual meeting!

HOA & Condo Annual Review Meetings Checklist Property Management Oregon